New York

Fabric Structures

No Boundaries

Fabric structures, the once and always lightweight workhorse, create a limitless design dimension.

Twenty years ago, the phrase “fabric architecture” referred to an outdoor tent or restaurant awning. Today, an ever-expanding palette of materials and vastly improved structural, lighting, and graphic technologies allow fabrics to escape the awning and take on new roles: multimedia canvas, iconic sculpture, branded totem, and architectural skin, just to name a few.

Town Hall

Please join us to discuss the programming over the last year, our plans for the 2014, gain your input regarding the direction, events and programming that you, the members, would like to see moving forward.

We would also like to thank our SEGD New York 2013 Chapter Sponsor, Designtex, for continued support throughout the year, and Design Communications and CREO Industrial Arts for their support with events this year.

Date/Time

Monday November 18, 2013

6:00 to 8:00pm

Location

The National Opera Center

Sue Gould

2013 SEGD Fellow and President 1989-1990

Sue Gould is a designer, builder, historian, calligrapher, master connector, role model, mentor, and self-admitted “New York cheerleader.”

Sue Gould, President of Lebowitz | Gould | Design, Inc.
New York, NY

Fossils Hall

Honor Award
Fossils Hall, American Museum of Natural History, Ralph Appelbaum Associates

Restored, reinterpreted and remounted in 1996, the fourth-floor fossil halls at the American Museum of Natural History are home to many world-renowned specimens. New graphics help communicate new scientific thinking about evolution, and help visitors understand the practice of science. The Hall of Vertebrate Origins explains how early vertebrates came out of the oceans on to land. Specimens and models are hung overhead, with labels on railing beneath them. All exhibits in the main path can be taken apart with a hex wrench, useful for special events and dining occasions.

Ralph Appelbaum Associates

Hanley-Wood's Trade Show Exhibit

Honor Award
Hanley-Wood's Trade Show Exhibit, McMillan Group

The client, an architectural and construction magazine publisher, wanted a high-end design that nevertheless connected it to the "industry." A combination of industrial materials and lights, together with stylish, curved walls and "ceilings," was the result. Oversized color reproductions of magazine covers were displayed in a surprising, dramatic way. The centerpiece conference room was framed by curving, black-framed shoji screens. A distinctive table finished the look.

McMillan Group

Heritage Trails

Honor Award
Heritage Trails, J.M. Kaplan Foundation, Heritage Trails New York, Alliance for Downtown, Chermayeff & Geismar

Four walking tours through downtown Manhattan link 50 historic and contemporary sites with freestanding interpretive graphic panels. Colored dots set into the pavement and hand-held maps are wayfinding aids. Visitors can plan their days and preview their tours at interactive video kiosks.

Chermayeff & Geismar

Levi's Jeans for Women Shop

Honor Award
Levi's Jeans for Women Shop, FCB/Levi Strauss & Co., Morla Design

Custom fixtures, furniture and carpeting help give this 3,200-square-foot, in-store shop its unique character. All design is based on the theme of a woman's curving shape, including sensuous photographs and furniture. Writing, which appears on the carpets and on dress forms, is based on entries from a woman's journal.

Morla Design

Science City

Honor Award
Science City, National Science Foundation, New York Hall of Science, Chermayeff & Geismar

An on-the-street exhibit that reveals how cities work, the Science City exhibit for New York Hall of Science and the National Science Foundation is a truly interactive piece. Visitors see the depth of water mains below through periscopes, look at the antennae through telescopes and read about infrastructure on interpretive signs. The idea is slated to be adopted by science museums throughout the United States.

Chermayeff & Geismar

Mirages of the Walls

Honor Award
Mirages of the Walls, Pratt Institute, Piotr Adamski

This project by a student at Pratt Institute converted computer pixels into black, white and gray tiles. The concept is illustrated with a design for the walls at 42nd Street Subway Station, featuring the faces and feet taken from a vintage photo of the Ziegfeld Follies dancers, who became synonymous with the area. To convey the scale of his design — the entire length of the 42nd Street Station — the designer used a mathematical trick, a spiral presentation that fools the viewer in to seeing the drawings in perspective and in context.

Piotr Adamski

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - New York