Connecticut

Alexander Isley

Alexander Isley is Creative Director of Alexander Isley (West Redding, Conn.), where he leads the team of designers, writers, and planners, establishing the strategic and creative vision in
all their work. 

Alex first gained recognition in the early 1980s as the senior designer at Tibor Kalman’s influential M&Co. He went on to serve as the first full-time art director of the funny and fearless Spy magazine. In 1988 Alex founded Alexander Isley Inc. in New York City. In 1995 he relocated the firm to Connecticut in order to be closer to trees.

Alexander Isley Inc.
Connecticut, CT

Cascading Columns

Merit Award
Cascading Columns, Christian Marc Schmidt, Yale University School of Art

In 1903, the Williamsburg Bridge opened as the largest suspension bridge spanning New York's East River. Never considered aesthetically beautiful, the bridge falls short in comparison with the acclaimed Brooklyn Bridge.

Christian Marc Schmidt, Yale University School of Art

NeXtwork Convention

Honor Award
NeXtwork Convention, Starwood Hotels & Resorts, Two Twelve Associates

The communication goal for this internal brand gathering was to engage and encourage managers and owners to think differently about their roles within the company as it moves away from a focus on real estate to a vision of the collection of Starwood lifestyle brands. The role of the environmental graphic designers was to immerse them in the brand-centric vision, excite, and surprise them with multi-sensory experiences as they mingled in a large lobby space.

Two Twelve Associates

Yale University Art Gallery Signage

Merit Award
Yale University Art Gallery Signage, Open

Louis Kahn’s 1953 Yale University Art Gallery building is one of the first examples of Kahn’s distinctive style. Located across the street from the British Art Center, one of Kahn’s last buildings, the Gallery (known as the Kahn building) is an architectural landmark in the city of New Haven. As part of a decade-long restoration by Polshek Partnership Architects, Open developed a comprehensive signage system guided by two basic principles. First, all of the signage needed to be reversible so that the original condition of the building could be restored.

Open

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