San Francisco

Gratefish Storm Drain

Honor Award
Gratefish Storm Drain, Grate Drains, Mauk Design

This design for San Francisco's streets was meant to solve the ongoing problem of people dumping automobile oil into the storm drains and polluting San Francisco Bay. Stenciled warnings near existing drains, the designer felt, need constant maintenance and do little to deter people who already know they shouldn't dump. The proposed grate, shaped like a fish, would graphically challenge people by making their dirty deed concrete: dumping oil on a fish.

 

Mauk Design

AmericaOne Identity

Merit Award
AmericaOne Identity, Vanderbyl Design

In a traditionally tame event with tame graphics, AmericaOne stood out with its snow sport inspired graphics. The client wanted a design that represented the cutting edge technology that goes into the sport. The use of non-traditional colors combined with hull graphics that violate the water line created a visually engaging boat representative of its speed and energy. The identity was carried from boat graphics to clothing/wet gear design to letterhead and website.

Vanderbyl Design

McSquared Restaurant + Zero°

Merit Award
McSquared Restaurant + Zero°, Propp + Guerin

This restaurant and café are located in a historic building in San Francisco's Barbary Coast district. The design challenge was to create graphics that worked with both the bold architectural elements and the traditional brick shell. The combination of the modern façade and bold graphics provides a contrasting foil to the area's more traditional architecture. The design intent was to develop a bold, clear identity to complement the restaurant's strong, modern lines.

Propp + Guerin

Metrius Trade Show Booth

Merit Award
Metrius Trade Show Booth, ReVerb

This newly launched web agency needed to generate a buzz and eclipse the much larger booths of competitors, while maintaining the consistency of its brand expression. Exploding the logo mark outward in three dimensions and creating visual depth through aluminum modular components, translucent materials, reflections, and shadows, the trade show booth presented an activated yet disciplined structural backdrop to showcase demos and presentations during the conference.

ReVerb

Pacific Bell Park

Jury Award
Pacific Bell Park, Debra Nichols Design

The scope of this project encompassed the complete graphic design and signage for a new downtown baseball stadium and included logo design, graphic imagery, and all directional, informational, code, identification, and concession signage. A grille motif complements the architecture by expanding on themes of natural light and exposed structure. The logo celebrates the unique San Francisco experience of a waterfront ballpark where a home run to right field just might land in the bay.

Debra Nichols Design

Debra Nichols

1998 SEGD Fellow

Debra Nichols found her artform at the intersection of architecture, communication, and art. Her approach is integrative, synthesizing elegant and energetic design with strategic marketing and smart problem solving. She believes that for anything to truly succeed, to create the spirit of the place, and to contribute to life in a meaningful way, it must be beautiful.

Debra Nicols, Deborah Nicols Design
Debra Nichols Design
San Francisco

Golden Gates

Jury Award
Golden Gates, Golden Gates National Parks Conservancy, Hunt Design

Golden Gates National Recreation Area Signage Plan

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area is comprised of 19 parks and recreational and historical destinations. Each year, millions of people visit Golden Gate parks to walk, hike, swim, surf, nature-watch, and learn about local history and natural resources. Signs and interpretive information play a vital role in the public's understanding and enjoyment of the parks.

Hunt Design

de Young Museum

Honor Award
de Young Museum, Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Debra Nichols Design

de Young Museum Signage and Environmental Graphics

San Francisco’s de Young Museum had been closed to the public since 2000 after being damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Designed by Fong & Chan and Herzog & de Meuron architects, it reopened in September 2005 on the same site in Golden Gate Park.

Environmental graphics were inspired by the building’s unique copper skin, a quilt of 7,200 panels that were punched and embossed to suggest light filtering through a canopy of leafy trees.

Debra Nichols Design

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