RES Previous

Research Journal Previous Years Articles

Environmental Graphic Design: Changing the Perceptions of Divided Communities through Cultural and Social Connectivity

Andy Schwanbeck

ABSTACT
This project explores the value that environmental graphic design elements can create to help promote and improve the perceptions of a neighborhood within a segregated urban landscape. Urban segregation occurs when a city’s diversities create perceived barriers around concentrated clusters of social groups. When these divisions are extreme enough, communities become shut off from the rest of the city and often fall into a perpetual cycle of struggle and degradation. Research has shown that the success of a neighborhood rests in its ability to connect with other neighborhoods and economies throughout a city. It also demonstrates that cross- participation enhances the overall capacity of a community to operate both socially and economically. In a segregated city, there is an opportunity to use environmental graphic design elements to help improve the perceptions of a divided neighborhood and reconnect it to the greater city population.

During this research, a case-study project was developed with the neighborhood East Liberty, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Historically a thriving neighborhood, East Liberty has been plagued by over two decades of neglect and failed renewal efforts. Despite recent development efforts, many locals still avoid this area. This case study uses a combination of research tactics and design prototypes to produce elements that attempt to improve the experience of East Liberty and create more positive perceptions surrounding this area. The results from this project measured a significant improvement to the negative perceptions of East Liberty and demonstrated the potential to entice more people to visit and participate within this neighborhood.

An Interior and Graphic Design Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Miranda Hall and Nicole Bieak Kreidler
La Roche College

ABSTRACT
Design has undergone many changes over the past several decades. What was once a trade activity is now a practice-based profession that has diversified into very distinct disciplines (Buchanan, 1998). Design disciplines have worked independently until recently, when interdisciplinary collaboration has become increasingly valuable. Studies have shown that collaborative efforts can produce new and original ideas not possible in a uni-disciplinary setting (Nelson, Wilson and Yen, 2009). Too often design education lags behind what is happening within the design profession and it is for this reason that this collaboration was initiated. The decision to plan the interdisciplinary collaboration came out of a discussion of the crossover of content topics within two courses in the Design Division at La Roche College. After additional conversations and planning, it was also driven by the desire to better integrate students and initiate them as co-creators.

Design Innovations through Collaborative Research Methods

University of Cincinnati

ABSTRACT
Technology is presenting new opportunities for designers and educators to collaborate in developing tools for reading instruction. This paper shares a collaborative research study that leveraged visual communication design, reading literacy, and educational psychology research to help teach early reading skills through a multi-sensory experiential learning tool. This study demonstrates how collaboration and design problem-solving can contribute to addressing communication design problems and developing experiential learning methods.

Full Immersion: Beyond the Page + Screen

New Media
University of Idaho College of Art & Architecture

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the potential for integrating Experiential Graphic Design (XGD) within the context of a traditional graphic design/visual communication curriculum. This shift will better prepare students to work in a constantly evolving, competitive, and expanding field of design. Through documented student projects, we explored the development of XGD strategies and methodologies through the blending of traditional graphic design foundations, interactive, and time-based media that transform a user experience beyond the page and screen. The success of this type of new curriculum model is made possible by the co-location of art, design, new media, and architecture in an interdisciplinary college.

The Sustainable Challenges and Opportunities in Environmental Graphic Design

College of Design & Innovation
Tongji University

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the sustainable challenges and opportunities in environmental graphic design through the lens of two projects implemented in Shanghai. The first, a wayfinding program for the Shanghai South Railway Station, is a study in using EGD to support and enhance sustainable behavior. The second, a signage and EGD program for a practice center at Tongji University, demonstrates EGD’s ability to support cultural sustainability, particularly in the use of typography and symbols to connect users and create a unique sense of identity.

SEGD Core Competencies and Subsequent Implications for Professional Practice

Visual Communication Design
University of Notre Dame

ABSTRACT
The educational core competencies defined by SEGD systematically employ the language of “understanding” as a measurement for evaluating student skills and level of expertise. Half of the 28 core EGD competencies defined by SEGD begin with the word “understanding.” Yet these statements invite broad meaning and interpretation in the design of instruction as well as in the assessment of student performance. This paper addresses reexamining the EGD Core Competencies to promote student performance measures that lend themselves to evaluation aligned to career readiness expectations in EGD.

Inclusive, High Quality Decisions? Macro/Micro Design Impacts within our Everyday Experiences

School of Design
Rochester Institute of Technology

ABSTRACT
Age and physical ability are natural filters for assessing the successes of designed objects, messages, and experiences. Design problem solving contributes (or not) to the resolution of challenges faced by aging and/or physically challenged individuals as they interact with products and contexts in the built environment. This paper examines some design details, solutions, and situations that impact everyday inclusivity and quality of experience, and suggests approaches toward understanding and increasing interaction success for all of us.

Pushing Design’s Edges with Sound Interactions

School of Visual Communication Design
Kent State University

ABSTRACT
Sound is temporal, social, invisible, and physical. Though sound has long been part of design, it has not held a prominent place in our discourse. While design education has historically focused on visual communication, the ways we might create, select, and remix sound can positively influence a holistic approach to projects, transform the way we might speak to an audience, and play a role in shaping human experiences.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - RES Previous