Honor 1998

Levi's Jeans for Women Shop

Honor Award
Levi's Jeans for Women Shop, FCB/Levi Strauss & Co., Morla Design

Custom fixtures, furniture and carpeting help give this 3,200-square-foot, in-store shop its unique character. All design is based on the theme of a woman's curving shape, including sensuous photographs and furniture. Writing, which appears on the carpets and on dress forms, is based on entries from a woman's journal.

Morla Design

Massachusetts General Hospital

Honor Award
Massachusetts General Hospital

The new wayfinding system for the complex of 18 public hospital buildings takes advantage of its recent redesign, which created a unified network of ground-floor corridors and lobbies. Instead of using building names, the new system is based on "routes" and "stops," like a subway system. People use ground-floor color-coded "routes" to find their "stop" — usually an elevator that takes them to their final destination. From there, building graphics guide users to departments and offices.
 

Two Twelve Associates

McDonald's

Honor Award
McDonald's, Gensler

Two McDonald's restaurants in two states received a new design treatment integrating architecture, graphics and space. The corporate identity is expressed through both as part of the interior and exterior architecture. At Colorado Springs, the giant box of French fries beckons customers; larger than the golden arches sign outside, it is both sign and sculpture. Inside the store, menu graphics become part of the décor. Instead of squinting to see one giant menu board over the clerks' heads, patrons can look at the small menu board posted by each cash register.

Gensler

Musee des Beaux Arts

Honor Award
Ministere De la Culture Direction des Musees de France, Coco Raynes Associates

Integrated signs for both blind and sighted audiences open the Calais museum's 19th century sculpture room to all. A Braille and audio handrail describes the floor plan and collection to blind audiences, who are permitted to "see" the sculptures with their hands. Photo sensors on the rail trigger audio descriptions that describe the sculptures and their characteristics for all visitors.

Coco Raynes Associates

The Newseum

Honor Award
The Newseum, The Freedom Forum, Ralph Appelbaum Associates

A new museum focusing on news, journalism and the role of the press in a free society needed a design that would keep pace with technology and the ever-changing nature of the news. It presents all of human history as, at a time, "news." Visitors can watch news broadcasts be prepared and recorded, are invited to write and edit news stories in interactive games and can air their news-related concerns at an ethics center. At the museum's entrance, a glass globe presents the names of prominent newspapers in their own typefaces. News-related quotations line the wall by the stairs.

Ralph Appelbaum Associates

Rodin and Michelangelo

Honor Award
Rodin and Michelangelo, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Susan Maxman Architects, Willie Fetchko Graphic Design

A quote from Rodin about his fascination with Michelangelo ran along the corridor wall leading to two concurrent Rodin exhibitions, one about Michelangelo's influence on the sculpture. Visitors could pass freely between the exhibits, which were anchored by three graphic scrims that provided an ornate architectural note to the plain gray walls and box-shaped pedestals.

Susan Maxman Architects, Willie Fetchko Graphic Design

Science City

Honor Award
Science City, National Science Foundation, New York Hall of Science, Chermayeff & Geismar

An on-the-street exhibit that reveals how cities work, the Science City exhibit for New York Hall of Science and the National Science Foundation is a truly interactive piece. Visitors see the depth of water mains below through periscopes, look at the antennae through telescopes and read about infrastructure on interpretive signs. The idea is slated to be adopted by science museums throughout the United States.

Chermayeff & Geismar

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children

Honor Award
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, HKS

Inspired by the hospital's new logo, but not wanting to simply reproduce it, the designers came up with a coloring book theme. It was designed to appeal to children and to reassure them that the hospital is a good place. Giant crayons — some of them supports for the signs — decorate the signs, which depict brightly colored stick-figure children. Several signs include fiberoptic lighting, which illuminate the signs at night.

HKS

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