GDAP 2002

AMTRAK's Acela

Merit Award
AMTRAK's Acela, AMTRAK/National Railroad Passenger Corporation, Calori & Vanden-Eynden

AMTRAK's Acela Specialty Station Signage Program. The Acela signage breaks new ground in the branding arena. Rather than being logotype-driven, the program derives its branding strength from its sculptural forms.

Calori & Vanden-Eynden

Bushells Tea Warehouse Signage

Merit Award
Bushells Tea Warehouse Signage, Dimension Data, Emery Vincent Design

The Bushells Tea Warehouse, a landmark heritage building in Sydney's historic Rocks precinct, was a tea-manufacturing warehouse from 1923-1975 but lay vacant until 1999 when work commenced on converting it into the headquarters of a leading information technology company. The goal was to design a contemporary wayfinding system that referenced the building's historic function as well as the technological nature of the client's business. The building is densely occupied.

Emery Vincent Design

D.C. Citywide Wayfinding Program

Merit Award
D.C. Citywide Wayfinding Program, Downtown DC Business Improvement District, Calori & Vanden-Eynden

The DC citywide wayfinding program is unique in that it actually became a reality after more than 25 years of failed attempts to design and implement such a system. Geared to the wayfinding needs of the city's 22 million annual tourists, this signage program is a huge success among both visitors and residents. The signs often appear in location shots on the television program "The West Wing." The wayfinding system consists of pedestrian-related directional, identification, and map signs, as well as vehicular signs that interface with local roads and highways.

Calori & Vanden-Eynden

Nortel Networks Calgary Campus

Merit Award
Nortel Networks Calgary Campus, Nortel Networks, HOK Visual Communications

Nortel Networks, a wireless telecommunications company, asked for an innovative atmosphere in their R&D facility in Calgary. Located in the Canadian Rockies, the environmental graphics combined wireless imagery and wordplay with a site contextual "outdoorism" that dominated the location's culture, especially the younger tech industry workers employed at this campus.

HOK Visual Communications

Explore Gallery

Jury Award
Explore Gallery, Bellevue Art Museum, West Office Exhibition Design

Designed to provide visitors of all ages with tools to assist them in understanding the design process of the building's architect, this exhibit space was conceived as an alternative to traditional art museums by allowing visitors to be hands- and minds-on, rather than passive viewers of art. The strong geometric qualities of the Gallery, trapezoidal in shape, necessitated exhibit structures that were simple and independent.

West Office Exhibition Design

The Genomic Age

Jury Award
The Genomic Age, Parsons School of Design, Christian Marc Schmidt

"The Genomic Age" is a fictitious outdoor exhibition in New York City's Union Square Park, open to the general public; the exhibition focuses on the social impact of genetic research, making scientific research in the field accessible and understandable to people of every age group. The exhibition is divided into five categories: Gene Therapy & Medical Treatments, Our Genetic Identity: The Human Genome, Genetic Research: Laboratory Technologies, Reshaping our Environment: Genetically Modified Organisms, and Our Future: Ethics & Predictions.

Christian Marc Schmidt

Los Angeles Zoo Master Plan

Jury Award
Los Angeles Zoo Master Plan, Hunt Design Associates

A complete wayfinding and signage makeover for the entire Zoo addressed a confusing network of similar looking meandering trails connecting over 300 exhibits. Over forty map directories and dozens of directional signs installed over the years have not substantially improved self-guiding by visitors. Hundreds of unrelated donor signs and mismatched operations signs add to the visual clutter.

Hunt Design

AIGA 50 Books/50 Covers Exhibit

Lot with a Little Award
AIGA 50 Books/50 Covers Exhibit, Chermayeff & Geismar

The challenge was to make a compelling exhibit – fifty of the best books and fifty of the best covers – appealing to AIGA members who had seen many of these exhibits in the past.

Chermayeff & Geismar chose a very simple color palette – white, black, gray, and orange – and tried to make single large design moves using as much space as possible. The books themselves do the communicating; visitors can pick up each item on display and there are plenty of well-designed captions to answer questions.

Chermayeff & Geismar

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