Experiential Graphic Design

Dead Sea Scrolls

Jury Award
Dead Sea Scrolls, Royal Ontario Museum, Royal Ontario Museum

The Dead Sea Scrolls are immeasurable in their cultural and philosophical significance. Physically slight, fragile, and fugitive, the scrolls deserve display with an uncommon design sensibility—one that does not consider the quality of beauty as belonging only to the eyes. The Royal Ontario Museum’s Exhibits & Design Department based its design of the temporary exhibition on best communicating the context, content, and spiritual resonance of the scrolls.

Royal Ontario Museum

Monastery Street Park

Jury Award
Monastery Street Park, South Side Slopes Neighborhood Association, Loysen + Kreuthmeier Architects

Once perched above steel mills and heavy industry, Pittsburgh’s South Side Slopes grew to become the proximate bedroom community for workers in the South Side Flats. In defiance of the challenging topography, buildings and parks were dotted about the wooded hillside. Connecting them, if gradients were too steep for streets, were stairs by the hundreds that served as public rights-of-way. Today the mills are long gone, and the Flats are better known for a hip urban mix of shops, galleries, and entertainment.

Loysen + Kreuthmeier Architects

Two Times

Jury Award
Two Times, Ermida Nossa Senhora da Conceição, R2 Design

Dois Tempos (Two Times) is the second in a series of typographical installations produced by R2 Design in the old Hermitage of Nossa Senhora da Conceição, in Belém (Lisbon), now in use as an art gallery.

With the goal of attracting new customers to the gallery, R2 developed a project that could also be integrated in ExperimentaDesign Lisboa 2009, an international design biennial. The biennial theme was “It’s about Time.”

R2 Design

Venturi Scott Brown Window Displays

Jury Award
Venturi Scott Brown Window Displays, Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates

Philadelphia’s Main Street runs through the city’s Manayunk neighborhood, an industrial mill town reborn in the late 20th century as a vibrant strip of restaurants, bars, condos, and nightlife. Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates relocated its office to Manayunk at the dawn of this renaissance.  One of the architecture firm’s contributions to the life and excitement of the street is through displays in the two huge storefront windows that span much of the building’s ground-floor façade.

Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates

2009 AIGA Bone Show

Lot with a Little Award
2009 AIGA Bone Show, AIGA Boston Chapter, Brandon Bird, Jeff Stammen, Christine Lefebvre

The BoNE (Best Of New England) Show is a biennial design competition, exhibition, and fundraiser to benefit AIGA’s Boston chapter. The 2009 theme was “Community,” and the design team’s goal was to create an exhibition that would celebrate the competition winners and the New England design community as a whole.

Brandon Bird, Jeff Stammen, Christine Lefebvre

The Context of Consumption

Lot with a Little Award
The Context of Consumption, Rochester Institute of Technology, Sarah M. Kirchoff

Garbage cans are often the center of pollution on an individual level. By implementing unexpected display approaches in particular public contexts, this set of three installations sought to heighten viewer awareness of this often-overlooked functional object and draw attention to issues of both individual and society-wide consumption and pollution.

Sarah M. Kirchoff (MFA candidate, project manager)

Empty Sky: The New Jersey 9/11 Memorial

Honor Award
Empty Sky: The New Jersey 9/11 Memorial, State of New Jersey Department of Treasury, Frederic Schwartz Architects

Just west of the tip of lower Manhattan and at the confluence of the Hudson River and the Atlantic Ocean, Liberty State Park played many roles in the events of September 11 and its aftermath. During the attacks, Jersey City residents and office workers gathered on the shore, witnessing the burning and collapse of the towers. Soon after, dozens of private, commercial, and Coast Guard boats shuttled evacuees from lower Manhattan to the docks at the park in the largest boatlift ever undertaken.

Jessica Jamroz, Frederic Schwartz, FAIA, Frederic Schwartz Architects

The High Line Signage

Honor Award
The High Line Signage, Friends of the High Line, Pentagram Design

Originally built for freight trains in the 1930s, the High Line is an elevated rail structure on Manhattan’s West Side that has been turned into the city’s most popular new park. The structure was saved from demolition by Friends of the High Line, a community-based non-profit organization that advocated for the preservation and reuse of the structure as a pedestrian promenade. In 2011, Phase 2, from West 20th Street to West 30th Street, was opened to the public. The first section, from Gansevoort Street to West 20th Street, was opened in 2009.

Pentagram Design

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