Design Thinking

Brandon Allen

With a combined background in Design Research, Industrial Design and Environmental Graphic Design, Brandon Allen’s designs emphasize his people-centric approach, as evidenced by his passion for creating dynamic and memorable environments.

Brandon Allen, EYP
EYP
Atlanta

Vikas Mehta

Vikas Mehta is the Fruth/Gemini Chair, Ohio Eminent Scholar of Urban/Environmental Design and Associate Professor of Urbanism. Dr. Mehta’s work focuses on the role of design and planning in creating a more responsive, equitable, stimulating and supportive environment. He works on various dimensions of urbanity through the exploration of place as a social and ecological setting and as a sensorial art. Dr.

Vikas Mehta, University of Cincinnati, DAAP
Cincinnati

Tim Fendley

Tim Fendley is Founder and Chief Executive Officer at Living Map, the digital platform that transforms people’s experiences of the world’s most complex places.

His passion is using technology to simplify people’s lives, and he has considerable experience in innovation, communication, wayfinding and digital design.

Photograph of Tim Fendley, Applied Wayfinding
Applied Wayfinding
London, UK

Jeff Risom

Jeff Risom currently serves as the lead designer working on an exciting project to transform San Francisco’s Market Street district into a vibrant, livable neighborhood of the future. As Managing Director of the legendary Danish architecture firm Gehl Studio in the US, Jeff Risom leads the San Francisco and New York based design teams.

Photograph of Jeff Risom
San Francisco, CA

David Meckel

David Meckel is a licensed architect and arts educator who began his career working with Charles and Ray Eames in their Venice, California studio. A few years later David Meckel directed all of the design work for the 1984 Olympics, which Time Magazine declared “Not just the year’s, but surely the decade’s most glittering and effective demonstration of the power of creative design.”

Photograph of David Meckel
San Francisco, CA

Design Anthropology as Bridge between Respectful Knowing and Making

Elizabeth (Dori) Tunstall
Swinburne University of Technology

ABSTRACT
“Design translates values into tangible experiences. What are your values?” This is a question Dori Tunstall asks students who take her courses in the Design Anthropology Program. Marking the boundaries between respectful knowing and making, design anthropology lives across and within design’s desire to serve as a positive force in the universe by drawing attention across evolving human values, the making of environments, objects, communications, and interactions that express those values, and the experiences that give interpretation to those values and their meanings. But design must learn to tread respectfully in order to avoid becoming another colonizing practice. In this presentation, Dori Tunstall explores the teaching of design anthropology as a hybrid praxis of 1) critical anthropological and design theory, 2) anthropological and participatory design research methods, and 3) design studio and social systems making. She outlines eight principles of design anthropology as a decolonized practice that seeks to be respectful of different ways of knowing and making. The showcasing of projects completed by students in her Transcultural Aesthetics and Contemporary Design course marks the limitations and possibilities of the discipline as a bridge between respectful knowing and making.

Bridging Social Networking and Professional Practice: A Catalyst for Professional Development and Integrated Design Practice

Leigh Lally
Virginia Tech

ABSTRACT
Social networking has quickly become synonymous with professional development. The architecture and design industry has the opportunity to harness this movement in new and creative ways in its drive toward integrated design practices. Integrated design1* practice by definition must serve the individual design discipline while engaging in a community of practice toward a common project goal. This research initiative is spurred by leaders in the field who indicate that a swift transformation to integrated design practice is required in the discipline in order for architecture and design practice to remain relevant in today’s global economy. Bridging architectural and design research and environmental graphic design provide the opportunity for both a broad and a distinct view of integrated design practice. Current research can inform the environmental graphic design discipline of best practices that promote excellence in design and professional practice as well as multi-disciplinary collaboration as an EGD core competency. As a researcher and practitioner, I am excited to engage the EGD community in dialog about innovative venues for knowledge sharing toward professional development and integrated design practices. As a campus designer and planner charged with EGD and the wayfinding master plan for the university, I understand the need for multi-disciplinary collaboration at a project level, as well as the challenges of timely professional development in a rapidly changing field. As a Ph.D. candidate my research focuses on harnessing social networking as a vehicle for collaborative learning which can be applied both at the design industry level as well as at the scale of an individual discipline such as environmental graphic design.

Bridging EGD: Introducing Communities to the Potentials of Environmental Graphic Design

Justin Molloy
The University of Oklahoma

ABSTRACT
This paper discusses the potential for environmental graphic design (EGD) in emergent and small communities where both EGD and the value of design are unknown. When designers arrive in a community for the first time, they tend to notice things other people do not. Things like how information and experiences are integrated into a cityscape or neighborhood, or how a vision of a community shapes the delivery of their identity or message. When I arrived in Oklahoma nearly a year ago, I was told that there were huge opportunities for design to make an impact. Designers in Oklahoma are aware of what could be possible, but “the bridge” to make design a community focus had to date not been completed. Leaders in these communities have not been connected to the full potential that design offers. Without this knowledge base, the users of these communities do not understand what design is. A common misunderstanding that complicates matters is that design is equated as marketing. Design is mistakenly understood as the way to “dress things up” or make something “eye catching.” The incomplete part of “the bridge” is the notion that design can be a transformative mechanism that goes beyond the surface, and has the capacity to change the way we experience our present moment and envision our future.

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