Colorado

Learning to See

Merit Award 2015
Learning to See

Learning to See, the permanent exhibit in the new Science Pyramid space at the Denver Botanic Gardens, brings to life the stories hidden within Colorado's landscape. By helping visitors of all ages and backgrounds to recognize the complexity of the scenes that surround them and understand their interconnectedness with the environment, the exhibit provokes exploration and inspires wonder. It also highlights, for the first time, the important research work conducted at the Gardens and the ways in which citizens can become involved in plant conservation research themselves.

Second Story, part of SapientNitro

Glass Artistry

Glass Artistry

Both palette and canvas, glass is infinitely mutable and eloquently transmissive. The seduction is powerful.

It is impossible to separate glass from light. It simply does not exist without light behind, below, before, above, or through it. It is that intrinsic relationship that draws designers and artists to choose glass as their medium. And as technology continually refines manufacturing techniques and lighting options, the possibilities inherent in glass are virtually limitless.

McDonald's

Honor Award
McDonald's, Gensler

Two McDonald's restaurants in two states received a new design treatment integrating architecture, graphics and space. The corporate identity is expressed through both as part of the interior and exterior architecture. At Colorado Springs, the giant box of French fries beckons customers; larger than the golden arches sign outside, it is both sign and sculpture. Inside the store, menu graphics become part of the décor. Instead of squinting to see one giant menu board over the clerks' heads, patrons can look at the small menu board posted by each cash register.

Gensler

Mountain Monorail

Honor Award
Mountain Monorail, Rocky Mountain College of Art & Design, Zach Lee

The Mountain Monorail project is a proposed solution to a high-speed, mass transit system along the I-70 corridor, which winds through the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The design concept for the identity utilizes qualities that reflect the pristine, dynamic, and unique nature of the mountain environment. Other suggestive elements in the identity help illustrate the idea of the monorail: the abstract shape of the monorail in the logo, the dynamic curved shapes that emphasize how the monorail wraps around its guideway beam, and the oblique type implying speed.

Zach Lee

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