segdDESIGN No. 27

National Harbor

On the Waterfront

With the help of environmental graphics, urban design, and public art, National Harbor makes a lasting mark on a blighted stretch of the Potomac.

Think of Washington, D.C., and iconic landmarks such as the Washington Monument and the White House likely come to mind. So when developer Milton Peterson of The Peterson Companies bought a barren 300-acre parcel on the banks of the Potomac just south of these historic architectural giants, he envisioned a classic rather than trendy mixed-use development that would look like it had always been there.

U.S. Green Building Council Headquarters

LEED and Then Some

The USGBC finds its voice in a new space that tells the story of its trajectory from ideals to international influence.

In April 2009, the U.S. Green Building Council launched LEED Version 3, its next-generation environmental rating system for buildings. The strength of the new system, says USGBC, is its leveraging of new building technologies and its “consensus-based, transparent, ongoing development cycle.”

National Mall Signage and Wayfinding

With All Due Respect

A new signage and wayfinding program for the National Mall informs and guides visitors, but treads lightly.

When Pierre L’Enfant envisioned a “Grand Avenue” that would serve as the central axis and monumental core of the District of Columbia, he dreamt of ceremonial spaces and a tree-lined boulevard "…four hundred feet in breadth, and about a mile in length, bordered by gardens, ending in a slope from the houses on each side..."

Washington, D.C., Environmental Graphics

A Capitol Idea

Washington, D.C., is a content-rich venue for the 2010 SEGD Conference + Expo.

With its vocabulary of granite and marble and limestone, carved letters and majestic sculptures, classical architecture and stately canopies of trees, Washington, D.C., tells a story.

There are many individual stories told within the walls of its museums, inside its art galleries, and on the stone tablets marking its memorials. But collectively, the city’s monumental features tell just one: the story of what it means to be American.

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