London

Participatory Public Art

Putting the “Public” in Public Art

From the SEGD archives, a new era of public art is collaborative, viral, and above all participatory.

Traditional public art is an interesting contradiction in terms—one that often has very little to do with the public, says Andrew Shoben, founder of Greyworld, a London-based artists’ group that creates installations in public spaces.

Fabric Structures

No Boundaries

Fabric structures, the once and always lightweight workhorse, create a limitless design dimension.

Twenty years ago, the phrase “fabric architecture” referred to an outdoor tent or restaurant awning. Today, an ever-expanding palette of materials and vastly improved structural, lighting, and graphic technologies allow fabrics to escape the awning and take on new roles: multimedia canvas, iconic sculpture, branded totem, and architectural skin, just to name a few.

Simon Borg

SEGD London Chapter Chair

Throughout his career, Simon Borg has worked for several multi-disciplinary creative agencies with experiential graphic design being the constant thread through these moves.

Simon Borg
London, UK

London Calling

Hello and welcome to the new and shiny SEGD London Chapter!
My name is Simon Borg and I've recently taken on the role of Chapter Chair for the Greater London area.

Over the next couple of months I'll be getting in contact with the UK members with an aim to organize a social event in the new year.

Looking forward to meeting you

Simon

Scorpion Knockout @NikePark

Honor Award
Scorpion Knockout @NikePark, Nike Football, Nike Brand Design

This event component of Nike's largest ever marketing initiative evolved over years to represent an environmental, interactive, branded experience charged with bringing to life kids' passion for football and the brand through authentic athletic participation. Nike launched the Secret Tournament campaign to promote Nike Football with 24 elite football players, eight teams, and one rule – first goal wins! The scorpion became the symbol for these underground tournaments focusing on speed and creativity, with an emphasis on making every touch count.

Nike Brand Design

The Sound of North

Merit Award
The Sound of North, Audi Design Foundation, David Sweeney

Wayfinding solutions for people with low vision have yet to take full advantage of emerging technologies. David Sweeney, a research associate at London’s Royal College of Art, investigated tools that could improve wayfinding experiences for visually impaired users and provide them with the luxury of choice and exploration while navigating. But while Sweeney’s research focused on the visually impaired, it also has implications for helping all users navigate public spaces and manage complex information about the built environment.

David Sweeney, Royal College of Art Helen Hamlyn Centre

Legible London

Honor Award
Legible London, Westminster City Council, Applied Information Group, Lacock Gullam

London is a city of complex structures, partly dating back to medieval times, with few long vistas but a multitude of destinations and attractive areas. With more than 27 million visitors a year, walkability is important. It’s well known that London’s “tube map” is one of the best wayfinding diagrams in the world. But the above-ground terrain has been less well served. Surveys conducted in conjunction with the Legible London program showed that more than 40% of people have been using the tube map for walking, too.

Applied Information Group, Lacock Gullam

Dimensional Maps

From the archives, circa 2012: Despite my anticipation and glee at what technology will allow us to do in the future, I want to sing the praises of what could be considered a rather antiquated wayfinding form: the tactile or dimensional tabletop-style map.

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