Legible London

Universal Signage: The First Step in Making Cities More Accessible

Of all the steps a city can take to make itself more pedestrian-friendly, developing a integral system of signage is both a quick and easy improvement that makes a world of difference--as shown by initiatives like Legible London, New York's WalkNYC, or Rio on Foot, in Río de Janeiro.

What Next for Legible Cities?

Tim Fendley at SEGD Wayfinding Workshop April 23

The Future of Navigation in Smart Cities

Tim Fendley,founder of Applied and chief designer of Legible London,predicts that navigation in city centers will change dramatically in the next 10 years, with place branding, urban planning, and technology as key drivers. He'll join other world-renowned wayfinding experts at the SEGD Wayfinding WorkshopApril 23 in San Francisco. Do you need to be in touch with the future of wayfinding? Find yourself there; register now!

Legible London

Walk This Way

London’s prototype wayfinding system aims to simplify a complex city and encourage walking.

With London’s numerous neighborhoods and boroughs, unplanned maze of streets, and dense road traffic, it’s not easy for pedestrians to find their way around. A 2001 London Area Transport Survey found that one in seven Londoners had trouble navigating the city on foot, and one in four feared getting lost. That’s to say nothing of the 27 million annual visitors, many discovering the city for the first time.

Legible London

Honor Award
Legible London, Westminster City Council, Applied Information Group, Lacock Gullam

London is a city of complex structures, partly dating back to medieval times, with few long vistas but a multitude of destinations and attractive areas. With more than 27 million visitors a year, walkability is important. It’s well known that London’s “tube map” is one of the best wayfinding diagrams in the world. But the above-ground terrain has been less well served. Surveys conducted in conjunction with the Legible London program showed that more than 40% of people have been using the tube map for walking, too.

Applied Information Group, Lacock Gullam
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