Denver

Ceramic Tiles of Italy AIA Exhibit

Merit Award
Ceramic Tiles of Italy AIA Exhibit, Italian Trade Commission, Mauk Design

While the function of this exhibit was to showcase Italian tiles, a fabrication requirement was that tiles be used sparingly to keep the shipping weight down. Each overhead pyramid lights a single tile, each weighing less than fifty pounds.

Minimalist elements allow the tiles to be displayed much like art objects. The entire exhibit is dipped in Ferrari red, as most Italian tile manufacturers are located near Modena.

Mauk Design

Richard Foy

1999 SEGD Fellow

Richard Foy co-founded CommArts with Henry Beer in 1973. The two met at the office of Charles and Ray Eames. CommArts was an office of architects, industrial, interior, graphic, and environmental graphic designers.

Richard Foy, CommArts, Stantec, Boulder, Colorado
Boulder, Colorado

Henry Beer

1999 SEGD Fellow

Henry Beer co-founded CommArts with Richard Foy in 1973. The two met at the office of Charles and Ray Eames and for 35 years, along with Janet Martin, headed a staff of architects, industrial, interior, graphic, and environmental graphic designers who created nationally and internationally acclaimed work for their clients.

Henry Beer, CommArts, Stantec, Boulder, Colorado
Boulder, Colorado

Asian Tropics Exhibit Master Plan

Jury Award
Asian Tropics Exhibit Master Plan, Denver Zoo, ECOS Communications

ECOS Communications was contracted by the Denver Zoo to develop the environmental graphic design, cultural thematic context, and exhibit content master plan for a new 10-acre, $50 million exhibit on zoo grounds. ECOS began the 12-month planning phase by developing a project mission around the core of the planned exhibit: Asian elephants' danger of extinction and how their survival depends on resolving human/animal conflicts. All design was developed to support that mission.

ECOS Communications

Sushi Taira

Merit Award
Sushi Taira, Rocky Mountain College of Art & Design, Taira Kato

Sushi Taira is a restaurant that serves authentic Japanese food within an atmosphere ranging from casual to high class, as well as from western style tables to private tatami rooms in a more traditional Japanese seating format. In order to attract a wide range of different people, the mark had to be elegant enough to attract a high-class clientele, yet modern enough to better familiarize people with sushi. Research shows that not many sushi restaurants have their own logo. Even if they do, the logo tends toward a generic fish.

Taira Kato

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